Masters of Scale Courses App

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About

The Masters of Scale Courses app is a highly curated learning experience designed to cultivate the entrepreneurial mindset for leaders at any level, and at any stage in their company’s growth.  

For its MVP, Masters of Scale sought to create and build a product for its podcast listeners that focused on a sophisticated learning experience. Offering premium content by distilling key insights centered around a 10 minute daily practice where entrepreneurs can then apply to their business.

Challenge 

There is little emotional benefit communicated through the current buy-flow, and little messaging about why one travel insurance is different from its competitors. Current travel insurance purchase sites are transaction oriented, and are functionally undifferentiated from one another.

Challenge 

There is little emotional benefit communicated through the current buy-flow, and little messaging about why one travel insurance is different from its competitors. Current travel insurance purchase sites are transaction oriented, and are functionally undifferentiated from one another.

.

Role

Sole Product Designer

Team

Product Manager
2 Developers
QA Analyst

The Re-Design Objective

For Version 2.0, the goals began to shift as the business wanted to expand its audience base beyond its podcast listeners. 

Part of strategy in expanding the audience was to integrate the podcast into the app by reaching users that aren't familiar with Masters of Scale. This new set of users are able to access free content without registering, and in time convert into paying members; essentially making the podcast offering a lead generation tool.

User Feedback 

With the new strategy in place there was also feedback from our user base that we had our community manager gather along the way.

There were common themes that touched on our user’s biggest pain points and challenges which we were able to tackle and include as part of the revamping of version 2.0.

Wireframes 

I spent a lot of time researching form design best practices and found Luke Wroblewski’s data-driven guide to be an invaluable resource. By utilizing this information we were reducing the amount of areas that could have been potential pain points for the user.

Beyond best form practices, which adhere to user centered design, there were other areas that I could leverage and bring in more of a 'human' touch.  Focusing on that resulted in the key findings below which I sought to implement into the buy-flow.

Wireframes 

I spent a lot of time researching form design best practices and found Luke Wroblewski’s data-driven guide to be an invaluable resource. By utilizing this information we were reducing the amount of areas that could have been potential pain points for the user.

Beyond best form practices, which adhere to user centered design, there were other areas that I could leverage and bring in more of a 'human' touch.  Focusing on that resulted in the key findings below which I sought to implement into the buy-flow.

Wireframes 

I spent a lot of time researching form design best practices and found Luke Wroblewski’s data-driven guide to be an invaluable resource. By utilizing this information we were reducing the amount of areas that could have been potential pain points for the user.

Beyond best form practices, which adhere to user centered design, there were other areas that I could leverage and bring in more of a 'human' touch.  Focusing on that resulted in the key findings below which I sought to implement into the buy-flow.

Main Pain Points

  • Lacking visual cues on the progress of a course
  • Unable to get a sense of “where I am today”
  • Hard to see an overview of all the content within a course

Wireframes 

I spent a lot of time researching form design best practices and found Luke Wroblewski’s data-driven guide to be an invaluable resource. By utilizing this information we were reducing the amount of areas that could have been potential pain points for the user.

Beyond best form practices, which adhere to user centered design, there were other areas that I could leverage and bring in more of a 'human' touch.  Focusing on that resulted in the key findings below which I sought to implement into the buy-flow.

Wireframes 

I spent a lot of time researching form design best practices and found Luke Wroblewski’s data-driven guide to be an invaluable resource. By utilizing this information we were reducing the amount of areas that could have been potential pain points for the user.

Beyond best form practices, which adhere to user centered design, there were other areas that I could leverage and bring in more of a 'human' touch.  Focusing on that resulted in the key findings below which I sought to implement into the buy-flow.

Wireframes 

I spent a lot of time researching form design best practices and found Luke Wroblewski’s data-driven guide to be an invaluable resource. By utilizing this information we were reducing the amount of areas that could have been potential pain points for the user.

Beyond best form practices, which adhere to user centered design, there were other areas that I could leverage and bring in more of a 'human' touch.  Focusing on that resulted in the key findings below which I sought to implement into the buy-flow.

Main Areas of Focus

1. Improved onboarding that emphasizes          quick access to a first listening                        experience.

North star metric: users are more likely to convert, once they’ve listened to MoS content.

2. Enhance wayfinding tools and visual cues      to aid in users' journeys throughout a            course.

3. Podcast content exploration

Onboarding

First up was the rethinking around the onboarding flow. Not only did we have to include the option for users to enter the app without registering, but we also had data informing us that users were more likely to stick around and convert to paying members once they engaged with their first listening experience. 

Wireflows

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Wireflows

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Wireflows 

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Wireflows 

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

User Flow

Starting out with a user flow allowed us to work through some possible avenues that users may take and would have helped us to identify any gaps. Through multiple iterations we landed on a flow that would enable the user to easily move through the first few screens so as to expedite their introduction to their first listening experience.

Wireflows

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Wireflows

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Wireflows 

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Wireflows 

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Onboarding Flow

Mockups 

Once approval was received from all major stakeholders, mockups were underway. Utilizing our design system, it was a pretty quick process to create and handoff to our developers.

Wireflows

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Wireflows

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Wireflows 

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Wireflows 

At this point, I decided to create certain key scenarios to better visualize two areas.

  1. How travellers were able to purchase additional coverage.
  2. How the medical questionnaire for travellers 60+ would function and be incorporated into the form.

I created four user scenarios, with each including the type of trip, the number of travellers, and their age. I decided to use wireflows to present to the client, as I find them much easier to learn and understand in contrast to a task flow or flowchart.

Onboarding Mockups

First Listen Stats

Activation Rate* increased to 75%, an increase from an average of 48% from earlier months in 2022.

* % of first time users who converted to a first listen

Progress Cues

We started by pulling some data to analyze how users were moving through the courses and the data showed that the majority of users weren’t moving linearly throughout a course. Based on this data we were also able to identify which learning style corresponded to each behavior, based on the Meyer-Briggs personality type. 

Coming up with three different types of user behavior helped us create the framework for an improved progress indicator.

Key Learnings

Usability testing was performed by the good folks at Usability Matters and the following were some key findings that needed to be addressed.

  1. Areas that contained certain branded copy wasn't valuable.
  2. Overall, the amount of time spent during the process wasn’t a major concern.
  3. The “Additional Protection” section was confusing.
  4. The quote within the top bar was easily overlooked.
  5. Participants didn’t respond well to seeing exclusions after they had paid.

With our recommendations, their internal dev team proceeded to make the necessary changes to address the issues encountered by the user group.

Key Learnings

Usability testing was performed by the good folks at Usability Matters and the following were some key findings that needed to be addressed.

  1. Areas that contained certain branded copy wasn't valuable.
  2. Overall, the amount of time spent during the process wasn’t a major concern.
  3. The “Additional Protection” section was confusing.
  4. The quote within the top bar was easily overlooked.
  5. Participants didn’t respond well to seeing exclusions after they had paid.

With our recommendations, their internal dev team proceeded to make the necessary changes to address the issues encountered by the user group.

1. The Time-Boxer
They like having a predefined structure and predictable demand on their time. They’re only interested in the 10-minute daily practice and don’t have time for anything else.

Results

We never received formal documentation in how the buy-flow helped to improve sales but was verbally shared with the Creative Director that the number of packages sold online increased by 30% over 3 months after launch, and monthly sales were up 75% over the previous year (but that takes the value of package sold into consideration, and we don't know what other factors contributed to that).

Results 

We never received formal documentation in how the buy-flow helped to improve sales but was verbally shared with the Creative Director that the number of packages sold online increased by 30% over 3 months after launch, and monthly sales were up 75% over the previous year (but that takes the value of package sold into consideration, and we don't know what other factors contributed to that).

Results 

We never received formal documentation in how the buy-flow helped to improve sales but was verbally shared with the Creative Director that the number of packages sold online increased by 30% over 3 months after launch, and monthly sales were up 75% over the previous year (but that takes the value of package sold into consideration, and we don't know what other factors contributed to that).

2. The Completist
Likes to complete everything, going from the beginning to the end and likes the structure of a well designed curriculum. They like to learn in a linear style.

Results

We never received formal documentation in how the buy-flow helped to improve sales but was verbally shared with the Creative Director that the number of packages sold online increased by 30% over 3 months after launch, and monthly sales were up 75% over the previous year (but that takes the value of package sold into consideration, and we don't know what other factors contributed to that).

Results 

We never received formal documentation in how the buy-flow helped to improve sales but was verbally shared with the Creative Director that the number of packages sold online increased by 30% over 3 months after launch, and monthly sales were up 75% over the previous year (but that takes the value of package sold into consideration, and we don't know what other factors contributed to that).

Results 

We never received formal documentation in how the buy-flow helped to improve sales but was verbally shared with the Creative Director that the number of packages sold online increased by 30% over 3 months after launch, and monthly sales were up 75% over the previous year (but that takes the value of package sold into consideration, and we don't know what other factors contributed to that).

3. The Browser
They like an overarching framework and then they’ll fill in that framework/goal in their own independent way. Appreciate lots of choice and the freedom to “jump” around. Not interested in following a predefined structure.

Results

We never received formal documentation in how the buy-flow helped to improve sales but was verbally shared with the Creative Director that the number of packages sold online increased by 30% over 3 months after launch, and monthly sales were up 75% over the previous year (but that takes the value of package sold into consideration, and we don't know what other factors contributed to that).

Results 

We never received formal documentation in how the buy-flow helped to improve sales but was verbally shared with the Creative Director that the number of packages sold online increased by 30% over 3 months after launch, and monthly sales were up 75% over the previous year (but that takes the value of package sold into consideration, and we don't know what other factors contributed to that).

Results 

We never received formal documentation in how the buy-flow helped to improve sales but was verbally shared with the Creative Director that the number of packages sold online increased by 30% over 3 months after launch, and monthly sales were up 75% over the previous year (but that takes the value of package sold into consideration, and we don't know what other factors contributed to that).

We sought to implement these visual cues/progress indicators in three locations.

  • Home
  • Courses
  • Post-Listening

Home

Being the first screen you see whenever you open the app it provides a “wayfinding” tool to help users to instantly see their progress and streamline a user’s daily journey.

Before

Home – v1

After

Home - v2 mockup

Before

  • Unable to directly access the course in progress.
  • Cognitive overload with the “Current Course” meter.
  • Lack of visibility into other content available.
  • Discourages users from completing multiple units in a day, or move on to the next daily practice.

After

  • Direct access the course.
  • Revealing all available content within a day/unit.
  • Ability to skip ahead to the next Daily Practice.
  • Clear visual indicator to show units in a course and their completion.

Courses

Keeping all relevant content contained within a visual hierarchical structure with visibility into the entire list of courses.

Before

Courses - v1 mockup

After

Courses - v2.0 mockup

Before

  • Unexpected horizontal scrolling by way of a carousel.
  • Have to dive two levels deep to access additional lessons.

After

  • Common vertical scrolling with short descriptors for easy scannability.
  • Visual indicators for the number of days within a course, as well as how many are complete.

Course Details

At-a-glance look at a lesson’s state: incomplete, in-progress and complete.

Before

Course Details - v1 mockup

After

Course Details - v2.0 mockup
  • Hidden lesson content.
  • Easily forget placement.
  • Unit/Day titles aren’t communicating the entrepreneurs that are within.
  • Clear structure and every unit with its lessons laid out to view at-a-glance.
  • Visual cues for incomplete, in progress and complete lessons.

Post Listening

The screen following the completion of a lesson. Providing this “wayfinding” tool yet again but in a contextual setting. Allowing users to continue on their journey by guiding them, but not being in their way.

Before

Post-Listening - v1.0 mockup

After

Post-Listening - v2.0 mockup
  • Users felt they arrived at a dead end, and there was nowhere to go.
  • Displaying too many options, with multiple paths.
  • Unclear which path is the “correct” one to follow.
  • Confusion as to what the CTA “OK” does/takes the user to.
  • Clear headline to indicate what’s up next.
  • Again offering the opportunity to skip ahead to the next Daily Practice.
  • Providing a path for those seeking to find their own content.
  • Easily close and dismiss this screen, returning to the lesson.
  • Opportunity to have users rate lessons listened to. Further aid in future customization.

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